Dating textiles

Like, antimony or chrome orange, chrome greens and yellows were popular in the period from about 1860 to 1880 and were produced, often in the home, from highly toxic chemical dye powders. Rich chocolate brown (think the color of a milk chocolate bar, hence the alternate name ‘Hershey’ brown) was often paired with white in quilts.In the British world of antiques, a divy is a diviner, one who can tell it’s the genuine article upon sight.Perhaps you’ve experienced a shiver down your spine when you find a vintage fabric; you just know it’s old and the real thing at first glance.Generally, by the early 1930s narrow widths were replaced by 36″ to 39″ for most all American dressmaking cottons and by the early 60s the standard was 42″ to 44″ though some 36″ widths cottons lingered on for another decade.

Quilts, women and men, from all walks of life and geographic location can open our eyes and our heart to those who sewed before us. Add tags for "Methods of dating ancient textiles of the 1st millennium AD from Egypt and neighbouring countries : proceedings of the 4th meeting of the study group 'Textiles from the Nile Valley', Antwerp, 16-17 April 2005".# Methods of dating ancient textiles of the 1st millennium AD from Egypt and neighbouring countries : proceedings of the 4th meeting of the study group 'Textiles from the Nile Valley', Antwerp, 16-17 April 2005Methods of dating ancient textiles of the 1st millennium AD from Egypt and neighbouring countries : proceedings of the 4th meeting of the study group 'Textiles from the Nile Valley', Antwerp, 16-17 April 2005 # Methods of dating ancient textiles of the 1st millennium AD from Egypt and neighbouring countries : proceedings of the 4th meeting of the study group 'Textiles from the Nile Valley', Antwerp, 16-17 April 2005Methods of dating ancient textiles of the 1st millennium AD from Egypt and neighbouring countries : proceedings of the 4th meeting of the study group 'Textiles from the Nile Valley', Antwerp, 16-17 April 2005/A de Moor; Cäcilia Fluck; Susanne Martinssen-von Falck; Study Group 'Textiles from the Nile Valley'.Clothing and textiles have been important in human history and reflect the materials available to a civilization as well as the technologies that had been mastered.The social significance of the finished product reflects their culture.Textiles can be felt or spun fibers made into yarn and subsequently netted, looped, knit or woven to make fabrics, which appeared in the Middle East during the late stone age.From the ancient times to the present day, methods of textile production have continually evolved, and the choices of textiles available have influenced how people carried their possessions, clothed themselves, and decorated their surroundings.So, your divy instincts having performed admirably, you know you have something old, but exactly how old and and exactly what is it?Fabric identification without the aid of selvage markings, provenance or an expert can be tricky. But there are clues to put you somewhere in the ballpark.Sources available for the study of clothing and textiles include material remains discovered via archaeology; representation of textiles and their manufacture in art; and documents concerning the manufacture, acquisition, use, and trade of fabrics, tools, and finished garments.Scholarship of textile history, especially its earlier stages, is part of material culture studies.

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